Fussy Cut Patchwork Cushion

Fussy cut patchwork cushion
Fussy Cut Patchwork cushion

The finished cushion in our organic cotton Isabella Blue and Ledbury Blue Grey.

 

Fussy Cut Patchwork cushion by Ali from Very Berry Handmade

We are very lucky to have Ali on board putting together these fab tutorials for us, and really showcasing our fabrics at their best. This month she takes you through the process to make a cut patchwork cushion – a great weekend project.

We would love to see your version so pop over to our Facebook page and share your cushions with us;

Clever placement of these gorgeous Ochre & Ocre organic cotton fabrics brings another dimension to their design!

 

Project Notes

  • Quilters use the term ‘fussy cut’ to refer to cutting out certain sections of fabric to create an effect or draw out a particular part of a pattern. Here I have carefully cut 4 triangles so that from similar sections of the print, and then stitched them together to create a new pattern from the existing designs.
  • If you don’t want to do the fussy cut section as the centre panel of the cushion then you can just cut a 24cm square of Ochre & Ocre organic cotton fabric and then follow the pattern from Step 3.
  • You will need two coordinating fabrics from the Ochre & Ocre organic cotton range – I used Isabella in blue for the fussy cut sections and the binding on the back (Fabric A) and Ledbury in blue and grey for the contrast fabric and the back section. (Fabric B).
  • You will also need about 0.5m of low loft fusible fleece (I used Vilene H630), about 0.5m lining fabric (thin plain cotton or muslin is ideal) and an 18 inch/45cm cushion pad.
  • The seam allowance is 1cm, unless otherwise noted.

 

Step 1

From Fabric A:

  • Cut 4 right-angled triangles (it’s quickest to use a card or paper template), all with the longest edge measuring 29cm. Fussy cut these triangles so that the apex of the triangle is positioned at a similar point on the print each time. (Pic 1)
Fussy cut patchwork cushion

Cutting out the triangles

  • Cut 2 strips measuring 6cm x 34cm and 3 strips measuring 6cm x 42cm – again make sure that these strips are cut from similar sections of the print on the fabric.

 

From Fabric B:

  • Cut 2 strips measuring 6cm x 26cm and 2 strips measuring 6cm x 34cm.
  • Cut 1 piece measuring 42cm x 24cm and 1 piece measuring 42cm x 34cm.

 

From the lining fabric:

  • Cut 1 piece measuring 42cm x 42cm, 1 piece measuring 42cm x 24cm and 1 piece measuring 42cm x 34cm.

 

From the low loft fusible fleece:

  • Cut 1 piece measuring 42cm x 42cm, 1 piece measuring 42cm x 24cm and 1 piece measuring 42cm x 34cm.

 

Step 2

Pin, then stitch, the first 2 triangles together. (Pic 2) Repeat for the other 2 triangles and then stitch the 2 halves together to create a square with 26cm sides. (Pic 3) Trim off any excess fabric.

Fussy cut patchwork cushion

Pinning and stitching the triangles together

 

Fussy cut patchwork cushion

Stitch the triangles together to create a square

Step 3

Take the 2 strips of Fabric B measuring 6cm x 26cm and, right sides together, pin, then stitch to opposite sides of the square. Fold these pieces right side up and press. Take the strips measuring 6cm by 34cm and stitch to the other 2 sides of the square. Press again. (Pic 4)

 

Fussy cut patchwork cushion

Attaching the strips to the square

Step 4

Take the 2 strips of Fabric A measuring 6cm x 34cm and sew to either side of the square, as before. Repeat with 2 of the strips measuring 6cm x 42cm. You should now have a square of about 42cm. (Pic 5)

 

Fussy cut patchwork cushion

Attaching the outer strips

Step 5

Apply the fusible fleece to the completed front cushion panel, following manufacturer’s instructions. Pin the lining fabric and outer section together, with the wrong side of the lining towards the fusible fleece. Quilt the cushion top however you like. I used concentric squares to emphasise the pattern. Trim the cushion top to measure 42cm square. (Pic 8)

 

Fussy cut patchwork cushion

Quilting the top

Step 6

Apply the other 2 pieces of fusible fleece to the 2 remaining pieces of fabric B. Fold the last strip of Fabric A in half lengthways to create a long thin piece of binding.

 

 

Step 7

Put the 42cm x 34cm piece of Fabric B and the matching lining piece wrong sides together. Place the binding fabric with raw edges aligned with one of the 42cm edges. Stitch with a scant 1cm seam (Pic 6 and Pic 7). Press the binding and fold it round to the lining side and slip stitch into place. You can top stitch the binding if you like.

Pic 6 Fussy cut patchwork cushion

Pin the 42cm x 24cm piece of Fabric B right sides together with the matching piece of lining fabric. Stitch down one of the 42cm edges. Turn right side out, press and then top stitch the seam.

 

Picture 9 shows the 2 completed back pieces.

 

Fussy cut patchwork cushion

The two completed back pieces

Step 8

Put the cushion top, right side up, on your work surface and place the larger back piece, right side down, on top, on the right hand side. (Pic 10)

Fussy cut patchwork cushion

Joining front to back

Put the other back piece, again right side down, on top. Pin then stitch all round the edge of the cushion. After stitching, trim the seams then finish them with a zig-zag or overlock stitch (to prevent fraying). Reinforce the section where the 2 back pieces overlap with a bit of extra zig-zag stitching inside the seam allowance.

 

Step 9

Turn the cushion cover right side out and press thoroughly. Insert the cushion pad and admire your handiwork!

Fussy cut patchwork cushion

The beautiful finished cushion

Fussy cut patchwork cushion.

The back of the finished cushion.

Fussy Cut Patchwork cushion

The finished cushion in our organic cotton Isabella Blue and Ledbury Blue Grey.

 

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  1. A weeny catch up | Very Berry Handmade - September 8, 2014

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